Energy Materials

Research Topics

We analyze rechargeable aluminum-ion battery systems as future long-term alternative of lithium-ion batteries. The theoretical volumetric capacity of Al ion systems is four times higher compared to metallic lithium. Additionally, the gravimetric capacity of Al ion systems is also high. In close collaboration with partners from industry and academia we develop new cathode materials and corresponding electrolytes. The materials are assembled into battery test cells and characterized with respect to their electrochemical behavior (cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy and charge/discharge curve). Our activities in the field of material development for battery systems support our activities on the system side with respect to the development of battery chargers and battery systems.

In addition we investigate novel materials for energy harvesting systems and explore the usage of silicon particles from recycling processes as material for thermoelectric applications.

 

Special Focus

 

Our main focus is the development of new cathode materials and corresponding electrolytes for rechargeable aluminum-ion battery systems, including electrochemical characterization.  In addition we investigate novel materials for energy harvesting systems and explore the usage of silicon particles from recycling processes as material for thermoelectric applications.

 

Services

 

We offer to synthesize powders as electrode materials and other functional applications, to characterize the size, porosity, morphology, crystalline structure and composition of powders and layers including their electrochemical behavior, to fabricate customer defined electrodes, and to analyze the electrochemical behavior in half and full cells by using battery test cells (El Cells®).

© Fraunhofer THM
Assembly of battery cells for cyclic voltammetry measurements.
© Fraunhofer THM
Demonstrator set up for the evaluation of energy harvesting materials.
© Fraunhofer THM
Plasma beam during Pulsed Laser Deposition of cathode materials far from thermal equilibrium conditions.